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The HungerFREE campaign is ActionAid's international food rights campaign
This annual report documents overall performance and engagements AAITG carried out during period 1st January to 31st December 2016. Divided into three main sections, Section one covers relevant...
‘Climate Resilient Sustainable Agriculture Handbook’ (জলবায়ু সহনশীল টেকসই কৃষি নির্দেশিকা) has been developed to enhance the understanding on the issues concerning sustainable agriculture, and...
A project started to enhance flow of information between residents and several relief agencies in drought-ravaged Isiolo County in upper eastern Kenya has been a huge success, becoming the envy of...
The recent experience from the field-visit to Faridpur has sketched deep mark on my mind when I saw community people reaping the benefit of the initiatives at the very inception of a project because...
Bangladesh has reduced poverty and improved living standards significantly in recent years despite the global economic recession and natural calamities. In spite of rising standards of living, some...

10th of October, 2011 (ActionAid Bangladesh) – As the global population hits 7 billion this month, ActionAid has today warned that a triple crisis of climate change, depleted natural resources and rocketing food prices, could dwarf the world’s ability to feed them all. 

Based on new research in 28 poor countries, ActionAid’s report ‘On the Brink: Who’s best prepare for a climate and hunger crisis?’ reveals which poor nations are most prepared for this triple crisis and which are perilously close to the brink. The 10 countries ranked most vulnerable – DRC, Burundi, South Africa, Haiti, Bangladesh, Zambia, India, Sierra Leone, Ethiopia and Rwanda - account for nearly a quarter of the world’s population. Countries most ready to face the triple crisis include Brazil, Malawi, Rwanda, Ethiopia and Tanzania. ActionAid warns that the world is coming to the end of an era of cheap food; that large scale agriculture has depleted the natural resources that sustained it; and that food prices - driven by rich nations’ insatiable demand for biofuel and food commodities - will continue to rise, unless urgent action is taken.