Africa http://actionaid.org/tags/429/15 en Women leaders speak out about land rights at Dutch ministry http://actionaid.org/2019/01/women-leaders-speak-out-about-land-rights-dutch-ministry <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2019/01/women-leaders-speak-out-about-land-rights-dutch-ministry" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/217643.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>In December 2018, grassroots women leaders from Kenya, Malawi, Uganda and India spoke at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the importance of land rights for women. Catherine Gatundu, the International Policy Manager for Resilient Livelihoods at ActionAid, was among them. The women were invited to provide suggestions for new Dutch development policy. Although the Netherlands has been supporting women’s land rights for some time, it is not always effective.</p><p>"Women in my country were never allowed to own land", said farmer leader Ellen Matupi from Malawi. Catherine Gatundu added: "Women are often not present when decisions are made about land."&nbsp;</p><p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M1s9yrMvukY" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0"></iframe></p><p>In Malawi, after pressure from women's organisations, there is a new law allowing women to own land, although that law is not yet available in local languages. In many other places, the struggle for land for women is not easy. The speakers shared their experience how women worldwide can secure their right to access and control land.</p><p>When asked whether Dutch companies are ‘behaving’ well and help secure women’s land rights, Catherine Gatundu answered: " Most of the times, when investors come into a country, they’ll hide behind the national law. But many countries have inadequate laws to protect women’s land rights. The company’s interest is often the bottom line. "</p><h2>Land rights: What is the problem and where are the solutions?</h2><p>In many countries, women do not have the same access and control over land as men. Where this does exist in policy, there is often great inequality in practice. This means that women are not able to participate in decision making over land. Nor are they recognised as farmers and therefore, for example, cannot claim access to credit, seeds and support. In many countries however women do most of the work on land and carry out unpaid care work, such as collecting water, firewood, cooking and primary care for children and the elderly.&nbsp;</p><p>Women's land rights are also increasingly under pressure because of the demand for cash crops for export, for example for the production of biofuels. Foreign investors often negotiate only with governments, national companies and local authorities about land acquisitions. Local communities and especially women many times are not heard, even if it concerns the land they have been working for generations for the sake of their livelihood.</p><p>A number of steps forward for strengthening women's land rights have been made through the elaboration of an international policy framework: the Voluntary Guidelines for the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests (VGGT) from the Committee on World Food Security of the United Nations as well as the policy framework for land management of the African Union. In many countries these guidelines are only implemented to a limited or only a limited extent. The Dutch government is committed to supporting activities that will lead to better application of these guidelines.</p><h2>The importance of self-organisation</h2><p>The speakers agreed that it is important for women to organise themselves, to know their rights, and to exert pressure. The women also emphasised that joint mapping of land rights and land use can help them to strengthen their land rights.</p><p>Catherine Gatundu: “When there is an interest in trade, investment from foreign investors, how ready are communities to embrace this investment without losing their own livelihoods? Do they know what they are going to lose?” She advised for more support for communities themselves to “put on record, on maps their relationship with space and what claim they have to it before external forces come to that space.”</p><p>Reina Buijs, Deputy Director-General of International Cooperation at the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, acknowledged that access to and control over land gives women more status and a stronger role in local decision-making. She emphasised that women from local organisations know the problems and therefore "are key in designing solutions."</p><p>She confirmed that the Netherlands aims to ensure that the international agreements on land rights are applied, as laid down in the Voluntary Guidelines. Gender equality and equal land rights for women are an important pillar of these guidelines. "The ambitions are high", she emphasised, "both on the side of the minister and Dutch parliament."</p><p>This learning event will be followed in January 2019 by a policy dialogue to anchor land rights for women in Dutch international cooperation. ActionAid is actively involved in this process.</p> </div> http://actionaid.org/2019/01/women-leaders-speak-out-about-land-rights-dutch-ministry#comments Africa India Kenya Malawi Uganda Asia Food & land rights Womens Rights International Wed, 16 Jan 2019 10:52:22 +0000 Janneke.Bruil 729193 at http://actionaid.org ‘Back Way’ to Europe: How can The Gambia better address migration and its development challenges? http://actionaid.org/publications/back-way-europe-how-can-gambia-better-address-migration-and-its-development-challenges <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/back-way-europe-how-can-gambia-better-address-migration-and-its-development-challenges" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/back_way_to_europe_web.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/back_way_to_europe_web.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>back_way_to_europe_web.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2018-07-12T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, July 12, 2018</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><strong>In the four years 2014-17, some 1.7 million people risked their lives by fleeing across the Mediterranean Sea for Europe, a journey in which over 13,000 have died or have gone missing. This report is a contribution to understanding what the proper policy responses to this movement of people should best be. It fo- cuses on young people in one African country, The Gambia, thousands of whom have been seeking a better life in Europe – often called the ‘back way’. This study asks: Why have so many young Gambians become irregular migrants and what can be done to help them and The Gambia manage this exodus and promote national development?</strong></p><p>Evidence suggests that addressing these questions involves analysing issues lying at the root of this migration. Until recently, Gambian migration was to a large extent the result of repressive government policies and the lack of political and civil rights. The democratic election of a new government in December 2016, which swept away 22 years of often brutal and repressive rule, means that the prospects for Gambians are much brighter now. But not all Gambian migration was the result of political repression and many young Gambians are still leaving the country.</p><p>Unless and until The Gambia improves job prospects and agricultural livelihoods – which also involves seriously addressing climate change – large-scale migration from the country is likely to continue. Young people are leaving because of the lack of jobs and opportunities in rural and urban areas, the lack of adequate support to farming which is being badly affected by climate change and because they see a better life in Europe.</p><p>But the other side of this is that migration can be a development strategy and a liveli- hood choice for people, who have a right to migrate for economic purposes if they choose. The right to movement and the right to leave and return to one’s own country are fundamental rights, but often overlooked in the debate about migration and devel- opment. Indeed, Gambians who have migrated are contributing to the development of their country by sending back remittances to their families. These remittances averaged US$181 million a year during 2013-15, equivalent to around 20% of GDP, one of the highest proportions in the world.2 Thus the relationship between migration and develop- ment is complex. ActionAid holds the view that the human right to seek safety, security, dignity, and sustainable livelihoods is inalienable and indivisible, and therefore calls for the humane treatment of - and reasonable assistance for - all those who are compelled to seek survival and protection.</p><div class="page" title="Page 6"><div class="layoutArea"><div class="column"><p>While the new government is committed to addressing many challenges the country faces, not all of its policies, nor those of The Gambia’s donors, are positive and some others are missing. The government needs to focus on prioritising support to agricul- ture - where 70% of Gambians earn their livelihoods3 - which means addressing the needs of small-scale women and men farmers and adapting to climate change. North- ern governments - which have primarily caused climate change – should also be doing much more to help address this in The Gambia.</p><p>And although it is mainly men migrating, the scale of migration is also having an im- pact of women – especially women farmers who constitute a growing proportion of the country’s agricultural workforce. This means that The Gambia’s agricultural policy must increasingly focus on benefitting women farmers. Women and families left behind by migrating husbands can be at greater risk of poverty, discrimination, gender-based violence and vulnerability from conflict and natural disasters. Specific approaches are needed to understand and address these emerging trends.</p></div></div></div> </div> Africa Gambia Europe Emergencies & Conflict Governance International Thu, 12 Jul 2018 13:38:58 +0000 Rob Safar 721958 at http://actionaid.org Empowered Women, Empowering Communities (French, ActionAid Senegal) http://actionaid.org/publications/empowered-women-empowering-communities-french-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/empowered-women-empowering-communities-french-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/empowered_women_empowering_communities-stories_of_change_fr.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="342" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/empowered_women_empowering_communities-stories_of_change_fr.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>empowered_women_empowering_communities-stories_of_change_fr.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2018-02-08T00:00:00+00:00">Thursday, February 8, 2018</time></span> </div> Africa Senegal International Thu, 08 Feb 2018 10:15:41 +0000 Rob Safar 714785 at http://actionaid.org Our civic space is shrinking. Here's how we've responded — and you can, too http://actionaid.org/2018/02/our-civic-space-shrinking-heres-how-weve-responded-and-you-can-too <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2018/02/our-civic-space-shrinking-heres-how-weve-responded-and-you-can-too" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/xkzxwyrxelhe85gxaqiskh7egriwxpjgptzewzolcupv0cjdi06k6_ybzkqcrylrcvixbj5nfl4sro7xylzu_aiqjfi1by464mjugr95t2xcvnijnvui8wlvdupi6aoc3zzntui.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>Over the last several months, <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/uganda">ActionAid Uganda</a> has endured attacks by external forces aimed at halting operations and undermining work in communities across the country. What began as a siege on our offices last year on Sept. 20 followed with the freezing of our bank accounts on Oct. 6, and intermittent disruptions to ActionAid Uganda’s work in the field. ActionAid was not the only civil society organization impacted by this onslaught and is unlikely to be the last, but as a direct result of our responses we continue to overcome and support others to do the same.</p><p>ActionAid Uganda and three of its partner organizations were raided by Ugandan Police back by government warrants in September 2017. Raids saw office equipment and possessions confiscated. In our case, all items taken remain with the police. On 6th October ActionAid Uganda’s bank accounts were frozen on allegations of illicit financial transactions, money laundering, conspiracy to commit a felony and supporting subversive activities to destabilize Uganda.</p><p>These attacks have caused immense disruption to our operations. The confiscation of possessions, seemingly inconclusive investigations, freezing of accounts, and halting of activities in the field have cost us program implementation work and distracted us from our mission. We lost income, as potential donors reconsidered projects or processes previously agreed, citing concerns around the safety of grants following the siege. Intense state propaganda portrayed us as a criminal entity investigated for economic crimes. Sections of the media framed us as an antigovernment opposition party disguised as an NGO. It was shocking to hear highly placed officials referring to ActionAid as an organization with a track record of spying for foreign governments. Ongoing claims left our image and reputation damaged and saw sections of the population turn against us.</p><p>Despite these setbacks we have persevered to turn crisis into opportunity, defending our right to be and de-escalating the situation on five fronts.</p><h3>1. Political</h3><p>Openly engaging with relevant government offices, our bank, the Financial Intelligence Authority and Ugandan Police proved we have nothing to hide. ActionAid Uganda submitted all that was demanded of us and reached out to donor allies and individuals familiar with the Ugandan state who helped us access offices ordinarily out of reach. Collaborating with peers and communities, we mobilized signatures from over 17,000 people, petitioning the prime minister to unfreeze our accounts.</p><h3>2. Financial</h3><p>We found creative ways of keeping the office open, financing our basic program activities, staff salaries, and meeting most supplier obligations. Negotiating with tax authorities and maintaining strong relations afforded us a remittance waiver whilst our accounts were frozen, enabling us to avoid unfair fines and expectations. These actions, along with our clean track record, gave tax authorities confidence in the organization and meant we maintained financial probity at the height of the crisis.</p><h3>3. Communications and public relations</h3><p>We kept actively engaged with mainstream media and had a measured presence on social accounts. We responded to government propaganda when useful, and relied on a public statement by our National Governing Board to correct malicious accusations against ActionAid. Behind the scenes, we maintained communication with staff and key constituencies to prevent uncertainty and/or counter state propaganda.</p><h3>4. Legal</h3><p>A prominent legal team familiar with the political landscape prepared a strong case, directly challenging the actions of the Financial Intelligence Authority and Standard Chartered Bank. Through a combination of direct court action and legal discussions, a consensus was reached that contributed to the decision to unfreeze the bank accounts.</p><h3>5. Learning</h3><p>After four turbulent months we’ve emerged stronger with an increased understanding of how to operate in the current landscape. We’ve learnt to be more agile, reaching out to people we wouldn’t ordinarily have contacted, bypassing the usual diplomatic routes. We kept open dialogue with agencies whilst retaining our right to explore other options, such as protesting and litigation. But the most important tool we used following the siege was sidestepping typical NGO structures and instead using a scenario matrix to plan for all eventualities and remain adaptive.</p><p>The road ahead remains slippery, mainly due to the uncertain political future of the country and publicly inconclusive investigations by Ugandan police. But as these attacks continue to try and deter growing citizen resistance against an evolving autocracy in Uganda, ActionAid remains steadfast as an important player in strengthening social justice.</p><p></p><p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://www.devex.com/news/opinion-our-civic-space-is-shrinking-here-s-how-we-ve-responded-and-you-can-too-92013">Devex.com</a>.</em></p> </div> http://actionaid.org/2018/02/our-civic-space-shrinking-heres-how-weve-responded-and-you-can-too#comments Africa Uganda shrinking political space Governance International Wed, 07 Feb 2018 13:13:43 +0000 arthur.larok 714626 at http://actionaid.org Policy Brief: Incorporation of Women’s Economic Empowerment and Unpaid Care Work into regional polices: Africa http://actionaid.org/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-07-31T00:00:00+01:00">Monday, July 31, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <h3>Time to start caring – how ignoring Unpaid Care Work is holding back economic empowerment of Africa’s rural women</h3><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Agriculture accounts on average for one third of Africa’s GDP and women make up as much as half of its rural workforce. Given the various commitments made on gender equality, economic development and agricultural policies, African agriculture should be a success story for rural women but this is far from the case. The most obvious challenge is the staggering unequal burden of Unpaid Care Work.</p><p>In response to these challenges this policy briefing was developed as part of ActionAid’s five year multi country POWER project. This is the first in a planned series of policy and research papers. It provides an analysis of the current policies, and practices, across Africa that relate to rural women’s economic empowerment and, in particular, the inclusion of the issue of Unpaid Care Work. It considers the successes and the gaps, and identifies opportunities for improvement. It also seeks to link Unpaid Care Work and women’s economic empowerment with the issue of Violence Against Women.</p> </div> Africa unpaid care work Womens Rights International Thu, 18 Jan 2018 12:37:59 +0000 Rob Safar 713803 at http://actionaid.org Our offices were raided in Uganda - here's what to do if yours are too http://actionaid.org/2017/10/our-offices-were-raided-uganda-heres-what-do-if-yours-are-too <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2017/10/our-offices-were-raided-uganda-heres-what-do-if-yours-are-too" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/8zheps49b6kxmhgnurf2pcpts9julpxjk_7prlq_pu0cnmzvvri1m8javi3wx1smuyawdnwkvjs6q2korxfvm1rzvmpy6aj5a91vxwjhqyn5oioqot2vp4ijdcdskwhhymlbzzsh.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>Last month, police raided the offices of <a class="c6" href="https://www.devex.com/organizations/actionaid-44486">ActionAid Uganda</a>, the <a class="c6" href="https://www.devex.com/organizations/great-lakes-institute-for-strategic-studies-limited-gliss-77834">Great Lakes Institute</a>&nbsp;(GLISS), and <a class="c6" href="http://solidarityuganda.org/">Solidarity Uganda</a>. More raids on the offices of other NGOs have since followed. Every indication is that we should prepare for a long, drawn-out attack on Ugandan civil society.</p><p>Uganda is one of a growing number of countries experiencing a closing of civic space, putting at risk human rights defenders and the communities we serve and protect. The <a class="c6" href="https://monitor.civicus.org">Civicus Monitor</a>&nbsp;offers a disturbing depiction of the state of civic space globally, with the latest developments in Uganda earning the country a rating of “repressed” — one category above “closed,” in a five-category rating system.</p><p>In this instance, the offices of ActionAid Uganda, GLISS, and Solidarity Uganda were raided by police in a cordon and search operation. At ActionAid, staff were prevented from leaving for several hours as police thoroughly searched the premises; removing documents and confiscating phones and laptops. The search warrant claimed that all three organizations were involved in “illicit financial transactions” and “subversive activities to destabilize Uganda.” The severity of these accusations and subsequent raids on other NGOs indicate that an attack on civil society is underway.</p><p>As this encroachment continues, I reflect on possible motives behind these recent attacks; what they might mean for the future; and what lessons we can learn, as we prepare for further threats.</p><p>The office raid appears to be part of a wider crackdown on legitimate protests against the plan to remove the presidential age limit from the Ugandan Constitution, thus allowing the current president to remain in power indefinitely.</p><h3>We think these attacks have ulterior motives.</h3><ol><li><strong>To delegitimize civil society</strong>. Police raids on our offices immediately present us as subversive elements. This could affect our public image, and that of civil society in general. It could also scare away our funding partners and threaten the stability of our work.</li><li><strong>To compromise our systems and information</strong>. These attacks disrupt our work, and potentially sow seeds for future surveillance by targeting our communications systems and infrastructure.</li><li><strong>To disrupt and derail us from our mission</strong>. Part of our mission as civil society is to help articulate public positions. We are opposed to regressive constitutional amendments. We will invest in organizing citizens to resist attempts to remove the age-limit, even though we know this puts us in direct conflict with the ruling party.</li><li><strong>To threaten and demoralize civil society</strong>. In the hopes of driving us into self-censorship, weakening our resolve, and preventing us from tackling injustice.</li><li><strong>To provide a justification for further action</strong>. Such as halting activities of civil society under the pretext that investigations are still ongoing. We have already seen this happening in the case of ActionAid, where two field activities have been halted by the police.</li></ol><p>What can we learn from these attacks and what should civil society do to defend ourselves in ongoing efforts to protect civic space? How can we ensure that we are not derailed in our mission to tackle injustice and poverty?</p><h3>Here are some tips if your office is at risk of being raided.<strong> </strong></h3><ol><li><strong>Always keep your house in order. </strong>You must update and back up all institutional information and documentation. During the impromptu siege, the police demanded documents without delay. If we had failed to do so, it may have caused unnecessary suspicion.</li><li><strong>Staff and board members must understand all processes in the organization. </strong>If interrogated, we do not want colleagues to inadvertently arouse suspicion by saying inconsistent things about how we organize ourselves and what our business processes are.</li><li><strong>Rapid legal response is necessary. </strong>As civic and political space continues to shrink in Uganda and globally, we must strengthen our legal response capabilities. The presence of competent lawyers is extremely important.</li><li><strong>A positive relationship with the media is essential. </strong>The media were very helpful in reporting the siege — and established relations meant they did so in a manner that was both supportive and objective. Social media platforms were of increased importance during this crisis, and future investment here is key.</li><li><strong>Being relevant to civil society and wider citizens’ struggles. </strong>The immense show of solidarity from other civil society organizations, politicians, and the public at our time of need demonstrated our value and relevance to civil society. The more outward looking an NGO, the more likely it is to receive much-needed solidarity from others. We were able to call upon our supporters both in Uganda and across the world to amplify our voice and provide solidarity.<strong></strong></li><li><strong>Beware of potential informers. </strong>Finally, we have learned that the forces that seek to undermine our work are in our midst. It is therefore important to better understand our internal environment and partners with whom we work. We must remain vigilant and transparent and have the confidence to defend what we stand for.</li></ol><p>The threat to civil society is far-reaching. We must learn from these attacks and work together to protect and defend the legitimacy and effectiveness of the work that we do.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://www.devex.com/news/opinion-our-offices-were-raided-in-uganda-here-s-what-to-do-if-yours-are-too-91288">Devex.com</a>.</em></p> </div> http://actionaid.org/2017/10/our-offices-were-raided-uganda-heres-what-do-if-yours-are-too#comments Africa Uganda shrinking political space Governance International Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:41:40 +0000 arthur.larok 710278 at http://actionaid.org Agroecology and Resilience Project Stories of Change (ActionAid Senegal) http://actionaid.org/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-stories-change-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-stories-change-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aerstoriesofchange.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="114" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/aerstoriesofchange.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aerstoriesofchange.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-21T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 21, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><div class="ibimage-with-caption null" style="width:555px;"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/dsc00091.jpg" alt="File 38293" title="" width="555" height="369" class="ibimage"/><span class="ibimage-caption">Weather Information System Helps Avoid Farming Losses in Bakho. Photo: Jenna Farineau, ActionAid USA</span></div></p> </div> Africa Senegal Food & land rights International Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:42:30 +0000 Rob Safar 708723 at http://actionaid.org Agroecology and Resilience Project Brochure (ActionAid Senegal) http://actionaid.org/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-brochure-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-brochure-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aerbrochure.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="185" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/aerbrochure.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aerbrochure.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-21T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 21, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><div class="ibimage-with-caption null" style="width:555px;"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/dsc00432.jpg" alt="File 38292" title="" width="555" height="416" class="ibimage"/><span class="ibimage-caption">Improving the food security of vulnerable communities. Photo: Djiby Sow, ActionAid Senegal</span></div></p> </div> Africa Senegal Food & land rights International Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:41:26 +0000 Rob Safar 708722 at http://actionaid.org Tax, privatisation and the right to education: Influencing education financing and tax policy to transform children’s lives. http://actionaid.org/publications/tax-privatisation-and-right-education-influencing-education-financing-and-tax-policy-tr <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/tax-privatisation-and-right-education-influencing-education-financing-and-tax-policy-tr" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/tax_privatisation_and_the_right_to_education_with_blank_pages_after_edits_with_adobe_pro.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-summary"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/international_-_tax_privatisation_and_rte_report_-_summary_-_29.01.18.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>international_-_tax_privatisation_and_rte_report_-_summary_-_29.01.18.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/tax_privatisation_report_online.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>tax_privatisation_report_online.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-01T00:00:00+01:00">Friday, September 1, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The current report is the synthesis of the participatory research carried out as part of the Tax, Privatisation and Right to Education multi country project, and is based on the national reports produced by ActionAid in Ghana, Kenya, Uganda and Pakistan respectively. It aims to shed light on how much families pay for education in these four countries and how these direct and indirect fees could be eliminated to enable access to education.</p><p>Findings signal that families have to pay a high percentage (ranging from 6.9% in Pakistan to 33.7% in Uganda for public schools, and 25% to 173% respectively for private schools) of their income in terms of schools related costs, even when public schools are supposed to be free at primary level in these four countries. Despite these costs, when all fees and levies are taken into account, private schools tend to be between 3 and 5 times even more expensive than public schools.</p><p>Yet, because of the lack of adequate financing, partly due to governments giving away excessive tax incentives and not curbing tax evasion, the perceived declining quality of public education in these four countries is pushing families to make hard choices to find other alternatives. Private schools are growing as a result of this demand and the lack of effective regulation, creating and entrenching social inequalities and leading to the stigmatisation of public education.</p> </div> Africa Ghana Kenya Pakistan Uganda Asia Tax Justice Education Governance International Fri, 01 Sep 2017 13:40:18 +0000 Rob Safar 707484 at http://actionaid.org The wrong model for resilience: How G7-backed drought insurance failed Malawi, and what we must learn from it http://actionaid.org/publications/wrong-model-resilience-how-g7-backed-drought-insurance-failed-malawi-and-what-we-must-l <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/wrong-model-resilience-how-g7-backed-drought-insurance-failed-malawi-and-what-we-must-l" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/the_wrong_model_for_resilience_final_180517.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> Jonathan Reeves, ActionAid UK </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/the_wrong_model_for_resilience_final_230517.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>the_wrong_model_for_resilience_final_230517.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-05-24T00:00:00+01:00">Wednesday, May 24, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The G7-backed African Risk Capacity (ARC) drought insurance policy was an <strong>experiment that failed Malawi</strong>, and <strong>in particular its women</strong>, in the face of a drought that need not have become a disaster. The insurance, for which Malawi paid US$5 million(m), failed to deliver on its promise of timely assistance, which 6.7m food-insecure Malawians so sorely needed, due to <strong>major defects in the model, data and process</strong> used to determine a pay-out. After the declaration of a national emergency in April 2016, uproar at ARC’s decision that no pay-out was warranted was eventually followed by agreement in November to pay Malawi $8m. But this payment, made only in January 2017, was <strong>too little, too late</strong> and effectively represented an economic loss to Malawi. In the meantime, the Government was left pursuing conventional means of raising money to buy food for its hungry citizens, with the total drought response costs estimated at $395m.</p><p>This technical failure has brought home to Malawian policymakers and stakeholders the more fundamental <strong>poor value for money</strong> of the drought insurance model so strongly promoted by the G7, the World Bank and other powerful development actors, and how their scarce resources could better be spent. <strong>Not one of the government officials with key roles in climate risk management or other expert national stakeholders we spoke to would choose to renew the insurance policy</strong>. Instead, they would use the money for no-regrets adaptation and resilience-building options that are proven to work but severely under- resourced. They would invest in making their <strong>social protection</strong> system more integrated, scalable, adaptive and universal; or supporting more <strong>climate-resilient, sustainable agriculture</strong> and more <strong>irrigation</strong>; or adequately resourcing <strong>decentralised disaster risk reduction</strong> (DRR) and enhancing the network of <strong>weather stations</strong>; or saving at least some of the money each year in a <strong>contingency fund</strong> for disasters.</p><p>The women farmers we spoke to additionally called for more <strong>inclusive extension services</strong> and more <strong>training in how to run their popular village savings and loans schemes</strong> (VSLs) and potentially grow them into cooperatives. They were unfamiliar with insurance and wary of financial institutions. They were already using a form of risk management through the emergency fund in their VSLs, but needed support to expand this.</p> </div> Africa Malawi Emergencies & Conflict International Wed, 24 May 2017 11:00:00 +0000 Rob Safar 700260 at http://actionaid.org